Your Home May Be About To Be Invaded By Unwanted Guests

Many home owners fear an invasion of termites showing up and nesting in their homes wood structure. The root of this fear is obvious as termites eat wood for sustenance, but one pest that isn’t as notorious but just as damaging: The Carpenter Ant. Carpenter ants don’t eat wood in order to survive, but they do build their nests in wood and are every bit the equal of termites when it comes to terrorizing wooden structures. The carpenter ant colony that is established initially is far from the colony that you will find as time goes on.  As the carpenter ants breed and their numbers increase, so too does the demand for space. Within a relatively short amount of time the carpenter ant colony will spider web it’s way through various areas of your homes understructure until they have established a proverbial carpenter and metropolis.

A common entry point into your home for carpenter ants is the garage. The exposed nature of the wood framing in your garage makes it ideal and easily accessible for the colony starters. It’s fairly easy to miss the initial presence of carpenter ants, but sooner or later you will start to notice fine, saw dust like particles on and around your wood framing. This is the first sign of an invasion! Things are now hostile and you should contact an exterminator ASAP.  While prevention is ultimately the best way to avoid dealing with a carpenter ant invasion, you may be caught off guard. If, in fact, this is the case then your garage may be in need of some structural repair. Hopefully this isn’t the case and you detect the presence of the ants early, but they may leave you in need of repairs to your homes wooden structure. Keep your garage safe and prepared with preventative measures and keep those carpenter ants at bay!

Torsion Springs 101

Torsion springs are a central component to the successful operation automatic garage door systems. While many of us utilize automatic garage door systems, few of us understand the ins and outs of how they work. This blog entry is going to go over the basics of torsion springs and how they work.

Torsion springs store the tension created by the opening and closing of your garage door. This stored tension helps lift the door and reduce the pressure put on your system by its everyday operation. These springs are normally mounted horizontally above the garage door and are made of material that is more dense than average springs in order to adequately store a large amount of mechanical energy.

Torsion springs naturally weaken over time as the garage door is opened repeatedly. As this happens the spring becomes less and less effective. If the spring reaches the point of breaking then your automatic garage door will not open. It is important to keep tabs on the condition of your torsion spring as it is central to being able to continue utilizing your automatic garage door system. The average life cycle of torsion springs is between five and seven years or roughly 10,000 open/close cycles. It seems like a big number, and it definitely is, but it shows there is a limit and using your automatic garage door system should be moderated.

There are dangers associated with garage door torsion springs. If the garage door is in the open position and the spring experiences failure, the door can come crashing down in a sudden fashion which could potentially injure any person positioned underneath. The biggest danger that can come with torsion springs is associated with trying to repair or replace them using the ‘do it yourself’ approach. Special tools are needed in order to effectively and safely change or repair torsion springs. If you do not have the proper equipment you are at risk of suffering potentially severe injuries as torsion springs repair involves many dangerous components that must be properly handled.